Dentists Who Invest

Episode 266

Ultimate Squat
Success Guide

Hosted By: Dr. James Martin

Dr. James: 

what is up everyone? Another podcast from the dennis who invest podcast. Looking forward to talking again to returning guests. And you know what we went all out today? Because we talk about squats. We talk about success all the time. Well, guess what this podcast is called the ultimate success guide to squats.

Dr. Bobby: 

Right, bobby, that’s it exactly the guide to setting up a successful squat practice.

Dr. James: 

Hell, yeah, let’s do it, and you know what? Let’s make it. On the insider knowledge, right, the things that people don’t know, because there’s everybody’s paradigm of how it should be done. Let’s talk about the sweet juicy nuggets. Yeah, that you only learn through going through the experience. But before we do that, how have you been mate what’s fresh?

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah, I’m, we do that. How have you been, mate? What’s fresh? Yeah, I’m really good, really good. Yeah, practice is booming. We’re very busy. Uh, another surgery is going in at the moment and just building the team. We’ve got two team members. Uh, everything’s in full swing. So, um, yeah, squat, life is good good stuff.

Dr. James: 

Good stuff successfully squatting then, so to speak, uh is the terminology you could use, I guess. So you know, in the you know members front. Actually, that’s an interesting one, because I feel like this is one of the things that people hmm, let’s say it’s a learning curve whenever you start a business. Yeah, what have you learned on that front whenever it comes to setting up a squat and finding and identifying the right team? Because, as I say, it’s a learning curve for everybody and the reality is you have to mess it up to get it right. It’s one you can only learn through experience, right?

Dr. Bobby: 

so we could spend a whole podcast talking about this. Last week I did a whole presentation to some dentists about leadership and business culture and how to build that and then how you build your team underneath that. And it is really difficult. You, when you’re first starting out, when you’ve never worked in your own business before, never hired people, never trained people, it is very, very difficult to find the right people. So you know, for me, when I set up the practice, the first question everybody asks is where do you find people? Where do you find good people to recruit from? And for me I was lucky because as soon as I put the word out there, I had people that I’d worked with prior reaching out to me wanting to come and work here. And a lot of that was because they could see the vision, what you wanted to build, how it’s different, and they align with that. And that’s one of the biggest tips that I can give for people is that when your business is up and running, you build something and people will align with what you put out there in the world.

Dr. Bobby: 

So our latest team member said she’s been following us for the last nine months. She wrote a whole paragraph in her cv about why she wants to work in our practice. Um, and yeah, my two team members actually went to her practice and met her around four or five months ago when we were connecting with practices for referrals, and she said to me as soon as your two team members left the practice that day, I knew I wanted to work in your practice and that’s a really good reflection on my team, which I’m really thankful for. But you know, that is a really good reflection on my team, which I’m really thankful for. But you know that is that’s a. It’s a big thing. You know what you put out there in the world. You know you try and find those people that align with your vision and they will come back to you.

Dr. James: 

You know what? I don’t want to steal the limelight, but I really do think that the world just holds up a mirror to how you act and how you behave. You know, and if you’re consistent enough in your message, the right people will come to you, and I suppose that is another example of that. Do you think there’s a lesson in there about content as well, because I know you do a lot of content and you’re projecting that message on content as well, right?

Dr. Bobby: 

content is key. Content is everything what you put out there about your practice. Uh, content is not just for patients, it is for your team members, your future team members, for everybody to see what you do and how you do it and you know what your vision is and how you’re changing the world, because essentially that’s what we’re doing. It might be in a small way compared to other businesses, but we’re changing people’s lives.

Dr. Bobby: 

We’re doing doing, you know really great dentistry and you know the content that we portray, you know, shows that, and one of the biggest things that we do when it comes to content, which is working massively at the moment, is filming all of our patients. So we just ask every patient when they’re finished with big treatment do you mind doing a little video testimonial for us? And we’re finding that 90% of them are saying yes, they’re absolutely fine with it and it hasn’t got to be anything really complex. We’ve got a tripod, we’ve got an iPhone. We do do some professionally with our marketing team, but majority of it is done in-house with a good quality microphone and a good tripod and a good phone, and that’s it, simple, and we just let the patients speak for themselves. We don’t need to tell people what we do.

Dr. James: 

The patients are doing it for us. Awesome man, and you know what you have to ask.

Dr. Bobby: 

That’s the thing. That’s the biggest thing. One of the things I’ve been working on with the team is getting their confidence up to be able to do that.

Dr. James: 

And we’re at a great point now where they don’t hesitate. You know, it’s just standard procedure. You know what? There’s something really valuable that would be interesting to know right here, right now. What do you ask them specifically like? How do you phrase it?

Dr. Bobby: 

so the way we put it is, dear mr or mrs smith. Um, you know we’re really, really happy that you chose us as a dental practice and we really, really value you know that you came here and we hope you’re really happy with you. Know the end outcome we have about, uh well, whatever it is. However, many of the patients who are, just like yourself, really nervous and are a little bit scared, but need the same kind of treatment that you’ve had done and they love to hear it from other patients that have been through that experience. So when you came to this practice, you were nervous, you’re scared, you knew you needed some big treatment doing and you’ve got through it and you know you’re really, really happy now.

Dr. Bobby: 

So would you mind just doing a little video testimonial, just talking about your experience here in the practice, and that’s it. Simple. And the great thing is, if they object to it or if they say that they don’t want to do it or they don’t want it to be used on socials, one thing you can say to them is okay, that’s fine, but do you mind if we still record something that we can just show to patients on a one-to-one basis? So when we have an ipad in surgery. If somebody wants to go through a similar treatment to you, we won’t put it on socials, but we can just share it with them in the surgery. Are you okay with that?

Dr. Bobby: 

and then most of them say yes to that that’s gold dust right there what a nice way to phrase it yeah, yeah, it works, it works, it’s not, it’s not difficult nice man listen. Thank you so much the hardest part is getting your team to be able to ask consistently that’s the hardest part and getting them to have the confidence to do that any way to incentivize that?

Dr. Bobby: 

we don’t incentivize it as such, but it’s just a matter of building trust with your team and you know, building their confidence by letting them know that you’ve got a belief in them and that you know they don’t need to worry. And you know, do the first few ones yourself and let them watch how you do it, how you speak to the patients, and then the more they see you do it, the more it rubs off on them.

Dr. James: 

Checklist, protocols, anything like that, or just you just ask them.

Dr. Bobby: 

It’s not that complex, don’t need to over complicate it. Yeah, some things you don’t don’t need to make. You know that that that complicated, it’s just end of treatment protocol. Uh, you know, patient comes in, we ask them, we ask them for google reviews, um, and we get our video, testimonials, pictures, final discussions and you respect.

Dr. James: 

Just to round off the finding a good team, uh, that topic, so to speak. When it comes to locating these people, aside from people that you have known and worked with personally, what would you feel are other ways that it’s good, that are advisable or suggestible or useful to find high quality staff and high quality team?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah. So majority of people will start with Indeed. That’s where the majority of people advertise jobs and that has worked for us in the past, but it’s generally been a combination of that plus social media. The problem with Indeed is you’ll end up sometimes getting hundreds of applicants and the last round that we did we had around about 60 applicants for the job for front of house and out of those CVs there was probably only four that we interviewed because the quality was really really poor. But out of those four it was the one who had followed us on social media, who’d already met our team before, who wrote a CV specifically for our practice, who wrote a CV specifically for our practice, which we were able to cherry pick out of that. But that’s a starting point. But socials is a big one.

Dr. James: 

You know what? Social media is still a hack and there’s still a lot of opportunities on there, even in 2024, like flipping. 18 years later, it’s still not reached peak saturation of the market. In my opinion, if you go out there and you’re semi-decent on camera, you can clean up, you can seriously clean up, or you have a little bit of guidance on content and what have you. That’s why it’s useful to have a mentor really on that front, in my opinion, but that’s probably a story for another day.

Dr. Bobby: 

Okay, cool team way to mouth Word of mouth as well. Just one final thing. Often you will find that the people that you need, you know people know people. So we have a phone with God knows how many hundreds of people in there Dentists, friends, nurses, practice managers and all it takes is a simple connection or a message. And LinkedIn is another good one, and linkedin, I think, is massively underutilized in dentistry, without a doubt, and it is huge, not for patients but for professional life as well I agree 100 awesome team content.

Dr. James: 

What are the other biggies? Or what are the other big hacks to making a successful squat? Because, remember, this is the ultimate guy, right?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah. So I’ll say, when it comes to finances, the biggest hack to making your squat successful is doing high value treatment. It is simple if you want to earn well and you want to be able to pay back your loans, you know quickly. Uh, big value treatments. So we’re talking full arch implants, clear aligners, smile makeovers okay, so they should all be top of the agenda when you’re starting a squat. If you want to start a squat and you’re focusing on general dentistry, it’s going to take you a very, very, very long time to pay back your loans. Uh, I’m not saying you can’t make good money out of general dentistry. You can, but it is a slow burn, it takes a lot of time. So you know, one of the biggest things I would say is a lot of people set up squats and they don’t focus on this enough. Um, but it’s that ability to be able to provide high value treatments, and those big value treatments generate more patient referrals organically because of the life-changing dentistry that you’re doing when you do that.

Dr. James: 

So that’s a massive thing for us flipping awesome and you know what it’s kind of. Something that you might think is how can we say almost like really, really really too obvious or too simple, but actually it’s massively effective and I feel like a lot of people overlook that. So I know that you focused on the implant side of things whenever it comes to high value.

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah, I overlooked it when we first set the practice. Yeah, for the first six months I massively overlooked it. Uh, you know, it was very heavily driven towards general with a bit of implants, and it was definitely the wrong strategy. So we re-pivoted, we um rejigged all of our marketing, went heavy on implants and pushed on small makeovers and the difference in our income was significant.

Dr. James: 

It was significant um, and you know it’s only going in one direction there you go and where were your implant skills whenever you started the practice? As in, what tier of proficiency did you have, or would you say that you had? Whenever it comes to implants, were you beginner? Had you done them before intermediate? I’m just curious. The reason I’m asking is there’ll be a lot of people out there listening today who are well, maybe if they’re not necessarily okay with implants, they’ll think to themselves okay, I’m gonna wait, or uh, that’s something that I can’t do, or maybe some other treatment modality that they want to specialize in. If they don’t have the skill set, do you feel like that’s a barrier, a massive barrier, or do you feel like they can quickly embrace it and get the ball rolling, or perhaps get somebody else in to support them on that front?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah, this is an absolutely fantastic question because I get asked this all the time. Or I get dentists saying to me I can’t set my practice yet because I don’t have the skill set to do this particular work. So my implant skills as intermediate, pretty comfortable with all simple implant dentistry no problems, anteriors, bone grafting, sinus lifts, full arches. I still have mentors and you know, the thing for me was is that I will provide everything within my practice. If it’s something that I can’t do, well, we’ll get somebody in to mentor me to do it.

Dr. Bobby: 

It is false economy to turn that patient away and not do that and lose the business. You know why would you not? If you don’t want to do it yourself, then bring somebody else in that does it for you and pay them as you would an associate, because you know that is the way you grow your business. So you don’t have to be the best clinician in the world when you set up your practice. Nobody is. Everybody is learning and you know you can say that at any stage of your career in dentistry because things are changing so much that you could just spend your whole life learning which is essentially what we do and upgrading our skills. But if you’re waiting for that right time to set your practice up because you think your skills aren’t good enough, you’ll be waiting forever because you’re never going to be good enough big, limiting belief that I had back in the day, whenever I was 27.

Dr. James: 

I enrolled in a pg cert and then a pg dip and I was like, well, I couldn’t possibly start dental practice until I’ve done my pg cert and then pg dip. And I look back now and I’m just like what a little baloney do you know? That was a big opportunity, cost right there. As it happens, life had other plans for me and I stepped away from dentistry. So it kind of all panned out yeah, uh on that front and uh, yeah.

Dr. James: 

But my mindset now is totally different. I would just go and do it and start a flipping business. That’s what I would do, asap. Uh, because that’s one of the greatest levers or things that somebody can implement into their life whenever it comes to enhancing their wealth, because you’re building an asset and you’re also building your cash flow, if it works, of course, if it works and of course it’s not for everybody, but yeah, just throwing it out there. The some of the most successful people I’ve met whenever it comes to multiple practices at a very young age they didn’t wait until they had a certain skill set. They’re still building their skill set and building the practice simultaneously. I personally think that’s the best way to do it I agree.

Dr. Bobby: 

I could not agree more. It’s a massive limiting belief. Um, but you know you, you’re great and what I think is, when you throw yourself into a situation like this, you don’t have a choice. You force yourself then to do it because it’s put upon you, and if you don’t do it, you don’t upskill, your practice isn’t going to grow, you’re not going to make as much money and you’re going to be in debt for longer. So you know, in your own head, you put yourself in a box now where I have to do it, I’m not in my comfort zone anymore that’s the thing there’s.

Dr. James: 

There’s a great power in deliberately putting yourself in that squeeze zone, so to speak, in my opinion, because you literally have to start doggy paddling. Are you with me? Yeah, it’s like sink or swim and you have to like literally start doggy paddling until you become a more confident swimmer. Of course, not everybody agrees with that philosophy. That’s an alternate perspective and certainly how I look at things and it sounds like we’re aligned on that one, okay, brilliant. So we’ve dealt with content, we’ve dealt with the team, we’ve dealt with skills, as in in terms of where we need to be with our skill set or we don’t necessarily need to be with our skill set as well, any other biggies I just want to come back to a couple of things with team members okay, yeah, absolutely, let’s circle back.

Dr. James: 

This is free freestyle.

Dr. Bobby: 

So let’s do that. A couple of nuggets that I’ve learned over the last year and a half. The first one is toxic high performers.

Dr. James: 

So the cristiano ronaldo’s? Oh, sorry, not to name names.

Dr. Bobby: 

What I mean by that is is that you will end up with people in your business who are actually very, very good at a specific role, but they they know they are and they don’t do any good for anybody else in your business, and as good as they can be at that particular role, it can destroy your business. So my number one tip is is that if you have somebody like that in your business or turns out like that, you have to get that in your business or turns out like that, you have to get rid as fast as possible.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, without a doubt, because it is no good having one like that, but then the rest of a team who are dysfunctional as a result of that yeah, kind of reminds me of a practice that I used to work in, uh in the day, but I won’t be in this because this is the thing. If they’re like that, it actually does drag morale down and it actually inhibits yes, they know their stuff, but it inhibits the learning that others can benefit from in terms of being able to approach them for their expertise, because they’re just not willing to do that because of their personality, potentially yeah, no, no, 100.

Dr. Bobby: 

And then the second thing I would add to that is um, yeah, we took an apprentice recently from another practice and she was really, really unhappy in that practice. Um, she wasn’t looked after very well, wasn’t trained adequately and she was just absolutely in tears when she came through the agency. And she’s been here and she’s doing really well. And it’s a conversation that I’ve had with a few people recently about apprentices leaving practices instantly after their apprenticeships are finished and about why some of the team members have come to work in this practice over other practices, and a lot of it has come down to the culture of that practice and what those practices have built.

Dr. Bobby: 

A lot of dental practices say that they struggle with recruitment and they can’t retain staff, but I think when you look around in dentistry, one of the biggest issues is that, unfortunately, team members have not been looked after. So you know I’m not saying you know you’ve got to do everything you know under the sun to keep them happy. But I think there has been a certain amount of neglect in the profession over principles, in supporting the team and their well-being and their development and their career pathways and their opportunities, and I think that’s another one of the reasons, you know why, um, our team have been so good, you know, and why they’ve come to work here awesome man.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, it’s, it’s. I think there’s accountability on both sides, is what you’re saying, right?

Dr. James: 

100 both sides. Yeah, cool, cool, cool, cool, cool. All right, awesome. So let’s go to the dentistry side of things once again, and this is something that I wanted to ask because I was just curious. So obviously we’ve got associate led and then we’ve got principal led practice, as in the principal is actively doing clinical dentistry. Do you feel that it’s best to have a plan at the start if you wanna make yourself associate-led, or are you best off just starting the practice and then figuring it out as you go along? What’s your thoughts on that? Because the thing is, if you plan too much, it can impede things and there’s so many more moving parts when it comes to the associate-led thing that you might just never get off the ground. Is what I’m getting at.

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah, it’s a really, really interesting question. So I think there’s a few different factors that come into play with this. So I think the first thing is it depends. Number one, how much do you enjoy clinical dentistry? So there are some dentists who want to open squat practices because they genuinely love dentistry, but they just want to do it for themselves and they want to have their own way of doing things, which is fine, and you know you’d end up with essentially a lifestyle business. Uh, you know, you have a small practice, you run it, you’re working it clinically, you build a small team around you absolutely nothing wrong with that if that’s what you want. Um, for me, the long term is to have an associate ledled practice and I just have the option then of doing the dentistry that I want to do. So, you know, in a position in a few years, I would just like to be the person who turns up and I get to do what I want to do. Whatever implant work I choose to do end up and everything else is just well managed and well run and survives on its own, and then you can go and essentially repeat that formula elsewhere.

Dr. Bobby: 

But one of the things I would say for people who are saying that squat practice is. To set a squat practice up that’s fully associate, led from the beginning for majority of dentists is not easy because unless you’ve worked with those associates, you know what they can grow, you know how they’re going to treat your patients, you know that they can convert or you’ve put a step in between that. So you’ve got a tco that does that for them, so you don’t have to worry about the dentist being able to sell treatments. Uh, it’s very difficult to monitor that. And the second, the third thing sorry is is that cash flow. So if you’re a principal led uh squat practice, you can build your cash flow a lot quicker and build your cash balance a lot quicker than if you’re an associate-led business from day one. So for me it’s easier to have a principal-led business where you can build your cash buffer, then introduce associates and transition into an associate-led business. But I just think it’s more difficult to do it the other way around.

Dr. James: 

First, yeah, plus getting the exact right team from the outset. Oh my god, that can not be easy. That is going to be a hard process, right? Have you ever seen anybody pull it off successfully?

Dr. Bobby: 

uh, I don’t actually know, not off the top of my head. I mean, I know people that do it successfully now, but it’s all gone through a process of where they were the principals doing all the dentistry and then it’s transitioned. So I don’t can’t think of anyone that’s really successfully right from the outset, straight off the bat. Yeah, I mean the two most successful ones. I can think of my old principal and obviously Amit Jilka, who you know really well. Both of those were heavily principal-led practices that transitioned into that, using their mentorship and guidance in building the associates.

Dr. James: 

There we go. Good stuff, just curious because for a lot of people associate-led is a dream. But I was talking to an accountant not terribly long ago and he said in his experience and remember he’s coming at this from a place of context he was saying that in his experience about 10, only 10% of practices are actually associate-led, which I’m surprised.

Dr. Bobby: 

I don’t know the actual figures, but I wouldn’t be surprised, but I guess that’s not including corporates, obviously.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, all associate led. Do you know what I mean? But I think that’s outside of corporates is what he was referring to yeah, I wouldn’t be surprised. I wouldn’t be surprised, to be fair this sounds quite right, because I thought that’s not. I mean, obviously I’m not doubting his figures, but I was just surprised that it was as low, so I was just cross-checking.

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah well, if you think about it, I mean even all the guys that I’m teaching mentoring, all the guys who set up there and girls who set up their own squats. At the moment, all of them are predominantly principle-led, so not a single one of them really want to do it to be associate-led businesses initially. Uh, every single one of them want to do it for themselves and they actually all enjoy dentistry, which is interesting, all right there you go interesting and you know what that’s actually generated a really good question in my head.

Dr. James: 

What you’ve just said. So, obviously, in your experience of mentoring dentists whenever it comes to setting up their own squats, you’ve covered some really good, valuable stuff today in terms of things that we need to know, in terms of we need to think of squat hacks, so to speak, to make the ultimate squat as we turn this podcast earlier. But what I want to know is when you’re mentoring people in the field, okay, what are the common misconceptions they have? Do you like Instagram versus reality? Right? Yeah, the common misconceptions they have. Do you like instagram versus reality? Right? Yeah, what is like their squats in their head versus squat reality? What are the differences? What are the big learning points for them?

Dr. Bobby: 

I’m just curious to know yeah, so biggest one, number one is the cost of starting a practice um, that’s definitely number one is always, always underestimatedimated and when quotes come in, generally it’s more expensive than what they thought it was going to be. The second biggest is the time demand and the expectation that they can work six days as an associate and set a squat at the same time as a big misconception. You know, if you’re about to build something you know for your future, you have to allocate some time towards it. You can’t be in surgery six days a week not being able to answer your phone, take calls, do viewings, whatever it is. You have to allocate some space in your life to allow that to happen.

Dr. Bobby: 

So that’s another big one. Right from the outset, um, yeah, right from right from the outset. And I think the the other one is once it’s open. Uh, exactly what we just talked about. So predominantly, most the most common thing is the team, and people have the expectation that the team is going to be the dream team from day one. It does not work like that. It does not work like that, it does not work like that Instagram versus reality.

Dr. James: 

Again, it’s exactly analogous to that, and actually that’s because you see a lot of stuff on Instagram and it’s like if you’re pushing too hard, you’re doing it wrong, and things like that, and I like that mindset whenever it comes to how can we say, um, you know, just making us reflect and understand that life doesn’t constantly have to be hard, but sometimes the stuff just needs doing, the doing just needs doing. Do you know what I mean?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah, that’s exactly it. With a squat, you know, there is a period where you’ve got to grind, no matter what.

Dr. James: 

Uh, it’s as simple as that hashtag, grind set, hashtag set, something like that. Respect, well, this is, this is, this is the thing you know? Is I think that, um, yeah, focusing it, because here’s the thing, the only one thing about the word grind is someone might actually enjoy the whole process, are you with me, right? Whereas grind suggests that it has to be difficult. Are you with me? Do you know what I mean? So, yeah, what I?

Dr. James: 

I like the term when it comes to starting a business. I like the term focus. Right, you have to be focused. Yeah, now, that may require energy or it may be easy for you. It may be the grind or it may be smooth, are you with me? But it certainly requires a period of focus. But here’s the thing I think that past a certain point as to when that point is difficult, say, past a certain point, actually it becomes more about delegating and thinking how you can take yourself out of your business. There is a period of time that elapses at which stage it can become optional to you if you have the right knowledge and the right mindset. It’s not always immediately at the beginning, at least that’s my belief. Set, listen, I’ve never set up a squat, but when it comes to business. It pretty much applies to all businesses no, I agree with that completely.

Dr. Bobby: 

And the point you made about focus is is too right. Um, yeah, everything requires focus and you know, one of the biggest things with setting up a squat is it’s very hard to lose focus because there’s so many moving parts and there’s so many different things that need doing. So, you know, the way I try and teach is is that we break everything down so you don’t need to worry about the next bit until this bit’s finished. You know you allocate your focus appropriately. So, rather than having, you know, 10 different tabs open in your head at any one time, you’ve just got the one you focus, you get that one done and then you move on to the next one and you just keep that focus rolling over, and then the same when you set the practice up. You know it’s just focus, focus, focus, but knowing where to allocate it and not spreading it over too thin love it.

Dr. James: 

And when it comes to allocating allocating a big part of that is delegating right. Any tips on that?

Dr. Bobby: 

100. Delegating is one of the hardest things that dentists find to do, me included. We are control freaks. We literally want to control everything. Uh, my team still say about me to this day um, but it does get easier. The more you do it, the more you do it.

Dr. Bobby: 

You know you get to a certain point in, especially in a squat where you might not know everybody, you might not know all of your team that you’re starting with. So it can be a bit harder for that element of trust and delegation to know that everything’s being done. But what will happen is you know over that period of six to twelve that everything’s being done. But what will happen is you know over that period of six to 12 months, everything will fall into place. Everybody will kind of get to grips. You’ll know how everybody works. And when you hit that spot it’s so much easier than to delegate because you’ve got the trust of everybody. You know it’s going to get done, and it’s a lot easier than to pass everything on. And the other key thing is having enough people to delegate to makes sense.

Dr. James: 

You got to have the team in order to delegate to the team, sort of thing. You know, I’ve got a really uh nice acronym that I learned recently on the topic of delegation ohio. Just like the american state, ohio only handle it once.

Dr. Bobby: 

I like that yeah, I like that that plays in my head a lot.

Dr. James: 

Only handle it once. If it’s delegatable, then ohio it effectively, and if you want a really good, do you know what I’m actually gonna ask you a question right now have you ever read the e-myth? I have yes yeah, okay, I’m a huge fan. What are your thoughts on the e-myth and do you think it’s relevant to people setting up a squad?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah, yeah, 100%, yeah, 100%. It’s relevant um you know, it’s um the principles outlined in that.

Dr. James: 

You know what we should be aiming for if you haven’t read it, anybody who’s listening and you want to own a business. It’ll change your life big time.

Dr. James: 

And you know what I almost put. I feel like it was one of those books because I’ve mingled with a lot of people who’ve read it that I almost felt like I’d passively absorbed the wisdom from it and, in fairness, when I read it, I think I’d probably heard like 60% of it just from having conversations with people. But there was that little 40% in there that I hadn’t come across yet. That just really put the cherry on the cake and it rounded off what I previously knew. That little 40% had like 80% of the value, just because it completed everything inside my head. So I really recommend it. I love that book, man. And and obviously, uh, have you ever read? Uh, I’ve talked about who, not how loads in this podcast. I’m not going to bang on about that again, because I always do. In fact, I’m pretty sure I talked about it on our podcast.

Dr. Bobby: 

I still haven’t read it, actually, but one of the dentists that I’m mentoring read it recently and he told me to read it and he got it from you, yeah that’s hilarious from you.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, that’s hilarious. I know who he is. I know who he is, uh, yeah, because we actually talked about it like two weeks ago, me and that guy. Um, so yeah, that’s a killer book. And then also another one I read recently checklist manifesto by atul gawande I believe it’s pronounced uh, checklist manifesto and emith. Okay, both really good books. You read them together it’s like put them five times the value, because they actually fit in with each other really nicely yeah, checklist manifest.

Dr. Bobby: 

Okay, that um often. The book came up a lot while I was doing my implant training quite some years ago. Um, and about the use of checklists, you know, in surgery yeah, important any more book recommendations uh, no, I still need to work my way through yours.

Dr. James: 

I’m like that. I kind of I’m like a vampire for people’s time whenever it comes to books. It is like I throw books at people and they’re kind of like trying to play catch up a little bit because I love to read, man, like it’s.

Dr. Bobby: 

There’s so many cool things that you can learn yeah, one of the things I’m reading at the moment, to be fair, is actually 100 million. Leads by alex formosi I gotta read that so it’s actually very simple, but it’s actually great about marketing and the principles and that can be applied to anything. Yeah, dental practices, whatever it is, um, but yeah, no, it’s a great great read.

Dr. James: 

You know what I’d love to read that book and do a podcast about it. I really need to do that actually I definitely would.

Dr. Bobby: 

I think people will find it very valuable yeah top stuff.

Dr. James: 

Bobby, we’re coming up to the 45 minute mark, which is usually where we round off these podcasts. Any parting words of wisdom from yourself?

Dr. Bobby: 

uh, no. The final thing I would just say is that if it’s something that you’re thinking of doing and you want to set up your own practice, you know for me it’s definitely one of the most rewarding and fulfilling things that I have ever done in my life and you know I absolutely have no regrets. Don’t get me wrong. There are days where it’s really tough, really hard. Sometimes you wish you think why did you bother? Uh.

Dr. Bobby: 

But then you know, predominantly 19% of the time, it is is blissful when you start seeing these big treatments coming through, when you start doing full-arch stuff and life-changing things, and you just sit back and think I created the practice for this to happen. And where would that patient have gone if they hadn’t come here and would they have got the same level of care and service? It’s a nice feeling to have that you know, to know that you created that for them. Um, and you know that’s one of the things that keeps me going. You know, money aside, that’s just one aspect, but you know that fulfillment that you get from it. You know you can’t get that in everything and we’re lucky we can.

Dr. James: 

I love that, bro, straight from the heart. What a nice note to end this podcast on bobby. You’ve been super generous with your time. As usual, guys, it’s been a real pleasure to present this hope everybody listening got loads of value. I’ll see you on the next episode very soon.

Dr. James: 

what is up everyone? Another podcast from the dennis who invest podcast. Looking forward to talking again to returning guests. And you know what we went all out today? Because we talk about squats. We talk about success all the time. Well, guess what this podcast is called the ultimate success guide to squats.

Dr. Bobby: 

Right, bobby, that’s it exactly the guide to setting up a successful squat practice.

Dr. James: 

Hell, yeah, let’s do it, and you know what? Let’s make it. On the insider knowledge, right, the things that people don’t know, because there’s everybody’s paradigm of how it should be done. Let’s talk about the sweet juicy nuggets. Yeah, that you only learn through going through the experience. But before we do that, how have you been mate what’s fresh?

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah, I’m, we do that. How have you been, mate? What’s fresh? Yeah, I’m really good, really good. Yeah, practice is booming. We’re very busy. Uh, another surgery is going in at the moment and just building the team. We’ve got two team members. Uh, everything’s in full swing. So, um, yeah, squat, life is good good stuff.

Dr. James: 

Good stuff successfully squatting then, so to speak, uh is the terminology you could use, I guess. So you know, in the you know members front. Actually, that’s an interesting one, because I feel like this is one of the things that people hmm, let’s say it’s a learning curve whenever you start a business. Yeah, what have you learned on that front whenever it comes to setting up a squat and finding and identifying the right team? Because, as I say, it’s a learning curve for everybody and the reality is you have to mess it up to get it right. It’s one you can only learn through experience, right?

Dr. Bobby: 

so we could spend a whole podcast talking about this. Last week I did a whole presentation to some dentists about leadership and business culture and how to build that and then how you build your team underneath that. And it is really difficult. You, when you’re first starting out, when you’ve never worked in your own business before, never hired people, never trained people, it is very, very difficult to find the right people. So you know, for me, when I set up the practice, the first question everybody asks is where do you find people? Where do you find good people to recruit from? And for me I was lucky because as soon as I put the word out there, I had people that I’d worked with prior reaching out to me wanting to come and work here. And a lot of that was because they could see the vision, what you wanted to build, how it’s different, and they align with that. And that’s one of the biggest tips that I can give for people is that when your business is up and running, you build something and people will align with what you put out there in the world.

Dr. Bobby: 

So our latest team member said she’s been following us for the last nine months. She wrote a whole paragraph in her cv about why she wants to work in our practice. Um, and yeah, my two team members actually went to her practice and met her around four or five months ago when we were connecting with practices for referrals, and she said to me as soon as your two team members left the practice that day, I knew I wanted to work in your practice and that’s a really good reflection on my team, which I’m really thankful for. But you know, that is a really good reflection on my team, which I’m really thankful for. But you know that is that’s a. It’s a big thing. You know what you put out there in the world. You know you try and find those people that align with your vision and they will come back to you.

Dr. James: 

You know what? I don’t want to steal the limelight, but I really do think that the world just holds up a mirror to how you act and how you behave. You know, and if you’re consistent enough in your message, the right people will come to you, and I suppose that is another example of that. Do you think there’s a lesson in there about content as well, because I know you do a lot of content and you’re projecting that message on content as well, right?

Dr. Bobby: 

content is key. Content is everything what you put out there about your practice. Uh, content is not just for patients, it is for your team members, your future team members, for everybody to see what you do and how you do it and you know what your vision is and how you’re changing the world, because essentially that’s what we’re doing. It might be in a small way compared to other businesses, but we’re changing people’s lives.

Dr. Bobby: 

We’re doing doing, you know really great dentistry and you know the content that we portray, you know, shows that, and one of the biggest things that we do when it comes to content, which is working massively at the moment, is filming all of our patients. So we just ask every patient when they’re finished with big treatment do you mind doing a little video testimonial for us? And we’re finding that 90% of them are saying yes, they’re absolutely fine with it and it hasn’t got to be anything really complex. We’ve got a tripod, we’ve got an iPhone. We do do some professionally with our marketing team, but majority of it is done in-house with a good quality microphone and a good tripod and a good phone, and that’s it, simple, and we just let the patients speak for themselves. We don’t need to tell people what we do.

Dr. James: 

The patients are doing it for us. Awesome man, and you know what you have to ask.

Dr. Bobby: 

That’s the thing. That’s the biggest thing. One of the things I’ve been working on with the team is getting their confidence up to be able to do that.

Dr. James: 

And we’re at a great point now where they don’t hesitate. You know, it’s just standard procedure. You know what? There’s something really valuable that would be interesting to know right here, right now. What do you ask them specifically like? How do you phrase it?

Dr. Bobby: 

so the way we put it is, dear mr or mrs smith. Um, you know we’re really, really happy that you chose us as a dental practice and we really, really value you know that you came here and we hope you’re really happy with you. Know the end outcome we have about, uh well, whatever it is. However, many of the patients who are, just like yourself, really nervous and are a little bit scared, but need the same kind of treatment that you’ve had done and they love to hear it from other patients that have been through that experience. So when you came to this practice, you were nervous, you’re scared, you knew you needed some big treatment doing and you’ve got through it and you know you’re really, really happy now.

Dr. Bobby: 

So would you mind just doing a little video testimonial, just talking about your experience here in the practice, and that’s it. Simple. And the great thing is, if they object to it or if they say that they don’t want to do it or they don’t want it to be used on socials, one thing you can say to them is okay, that’s fine, but do you mind if we still record something that we can just show to patients on a one-to-one basis? So when we have an ipad in surgery. If somebody wants to go through a similar treatment to you, we won’t put it on socials, but we can just share it with them in the surgery. Are you okay with that?

Dr. Bobby: 

and then most of them say yes to that that’s gold dust right there what a nice way to phrase it yeah, yeah, it works, it works, it’s not, it’s not difficult nice man listen. Thank you so much the hardest part is getting your team to be able to ask consistently that’s the hardest part and getting them to have the confidence to do that any way to incentivize that?

Dr. Bobby: 

we don’t incentivize it as such, but it’s just a matter of building trust with your team and you know, building their confidence by letting them know that you’ve got a belief in them and that you know they don’t need to worry. And you know, do the first few ones yourself and let them watch how you do it, how you speak to the patients, and then the more they see you do it, the more it rubs off on them.

Dr. James: 

Checklist, protocols, anything like that, or just you just ask them.

Dr. Bobby: 

It’s not that complex, don’t need to over complicate it. Yeah, some things you don’t don’t need to make. You know that that that complicated, it’s just end of treatment protocol. Uh, you know, patient comes in, we ask them, we ask them for google reviews, um, and we get our video, testimonials, pictures, final discussions and you respect.

Dr. James: 

Just to round off the finding a good team, uh, that topic, so to speak. When it comes to locating these people, aside from people that you have known and worked with personally, what would you feel are other ways that it’s good, that are advisable or suggestible or useful to find high quality staff and high quality team?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah. So majority of people will start with Indeed. That’s where the majority of people advertise jobs and that has worked for us in the past, but it’s generally been a combination of that plus social media. The problem with Indeed is you’ll end up sometimes getting hundreds of applicants and the last round that we did we had around about 60 applicants for the job for front of house and out of those CVs there was probably only four that we interviewed because the quality was really really poor. But out of those four it was the one who had followed us on social media, who’d already met our team before, who wrote a CV specifically for our practice, who wrote a CV specifically for our practice, which we were able to cherry pick out of that. But that’s a starting point. But socials is a big one.

Dr. James: 

You know what? Social media is still a hack and there’s still a lot of opportunities on there, even in 2024, like flipping. 18 years later, it’s still not reached peak saturation of the market. In my opinion, if you go out there and you’re semi-decent on camera, you can clean up, you can seriously clean up, or you have a little bit of guidance on content and what have you. That’s why it’s useful to have a mentor really on that front, in my opinion, but that’s probably a story for another day.

Dr. Bobby: 

Okay, cool team way to mouth Word of mouth as well. Just one final thing. Often you will find that the people that you need, you know people know people. So we have a phone with God knows how many hundreds of people in there Dentists, friends, nurses, practice managers and all it takes is a simple connection or a message. And LinkedIn is another good one, and linkedin, I think, is massively underutilized in dentistry, without a doubt, and it is huge, not for patients but for professional life as well I agree 100 awesome team content.

Dr. James: 

What are the other biggies? Or what are the other big hacks to making a successful squat? Because, remember, this is the ultimate guy, right?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah. So I’ll say, when it comes to finances, the biggest hack to making your squat successful is doing high value treatment. It is simple if you want to earn well and you want to be able to pay back your loans, you know quickly. Uh, big value treatments. So we’re talking full arch implants, clear aligners, smile makeovers okay, so they should all be top of the agenda when you’re starting a squat. If you want to start a squat and you’re focusing on general dentistry, it’s going to take you a very, very, very long time to pay back your loans. Uh, I’m not saying you can’t make good money out of general dentistry. You can, but it is a slow burn, it takes a lot of time. So you know, one of the biggest things I would say is a lot of people set up squats and they don’t focus on this enough. Um, but it’s that ability to be able to provide high value treatments, and those big value treatments generate more patient referrals organically because of the life-changing dentistry that you’re doing when you do that.

Dr. James: 

So that’s a massive thing for us flipping awesome and you know what it’s kind of. Something that you might think is how can we say almost like really, really really too obvious or too simple, but actually it’s massively effective and I feel like a lot of people overlook that. So I know that you focused on the implant side of things whenever it comes to high value.

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah, I overlooked it when we first set the practice. Yeah, for the first six months I massively overlooked it. Uh, you know, it was very heavily driven towards general with a bit of implants, and it was definitely the wrong strategy. So we re-pivoted, we um rejigged all of our marketing, went heavy on implants and pushed on small makeovers and the difference in our income was significant.

Dr. James: 

It was significant um, and you know it’s only going in one direction there you go and where were your implant skills whenever you started the practice? As in, what tier of proficiency did you have, or would you say that you had? Whenever it comes to implants, were you beginner? Had you done them before intermediate? I’m just curious. The reason I’m asking is there’ll be a lot of people out there listening today who are well, maybe if they’re not necessarily okay with implants, they’ll think to themselves okay, I’m gonna wait, or uh, that’s something that I can’t do, or maybe some other treatment modality that they want to specialize in. If they don’t have the skill set, do you feel like that’s a barrier, a massive barrier, or do you feel like they can quickly embrace it and get the ball rolling, or perhaps get somebody else in to support them on that front?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah, this is an absolutely fantastic question because I get asked this all the time. Or I get dentists saying to me I can’t set my practice yet because I don’t have the skill set to do this particular work. So my implant skills as intermediate, pretty comfortable with all simple implant dentistry no problems, anteriors, bone grafting, sinus lifts, full arches. I still have mentors and you know, the thing for me was is that I will provide everything within my practice. If it’s something that I can’t do, well, we’ll get somebody in to mentor me to do it.

Dr. Bobby: 

It is false economy to turn that patient away and not do that and lose the business. You know why would you not? If you don’t want to do it yourself, then bring somebody else in that does it for you and pay them as you would an associate, because you know that is the way you grow your business. So you don’t have to be the best clinician in the world when you set up your practice. Nobody is. Everybody is learning and you know you can say that at any stage of your career in dentistry because things are changing so much that you could just spend your whole life learning which is essentially what we do and upgrading our skills. But if you’re waiting for that right time to set your practice up because you think your skills aren’t good enough, you’ll be waiting forever because you’re never going to be good enough big, limiting belief that I had back in the day, whenever I was 27.

Dr. James: 

I enrolled in a pg cert and then a pg dip and I was like, well, I couldn’t possibly start dental practice until I’ve done my pg cert and then pg dip. And I look back now and I’m just like what a little baloney do you know? That was a big opportunity, cost right there. As it happens, life had other plans for me and I stepped away from dentistry. So it kind of all panned out yeah, uh on that front and uh, yeah.

Dr. James: 

But my mindset now is totally different. I would just go and do it and start a flipping business. That’s what I would do, asap. Uh, because that’s one of the greatest levers or things that somebody can implement into their life whenever it comes to enhancing their wealth, because you’re building an asset and you’re also building your cash flow, if it works, of course, if it works and of course it’s not for everybody, but yeah, just throwing it out there. The some of the most successful people I’ve met whenever it comes to multiple practices at a very young age they didn’t wait until they had a certain skill set. They’re still building their skill set and building the practice simultaneously. I personally think that’s the best way to do it I agree.

Dr. Bobby: 

I could not agree more. It’s a massive limiting belief. Um, but you know you, you’re great and what I think is, when you throw yourself into a situation like this, you don’t have a choice. You force yourself then to do it because it’s put upon you, and if you don’t do it, you don’t upskill, your practice isn’t going to grow, you’re not going to make as much money and you’re going to be in debt for longer. So you know, in your own head, you put yourself in a box now where I have to do it, I’m not in my comfort zone anymore that’s the thing there’s.

Dr. James: 

There’s a great power in deliberately putting yourself in that squeeze zone, so to speak, in my opinion, because you literally have to start doggy paddling. Are you with me? Yeah, it’s like sink or swim and you have to like literally start doggy paddling until you become a more confident swimmer. Of course, not everybody agrees with that philosophy. That’s an alternate perspective and certainly how I look at things and it sounds like we’re aligned on that one, okay, brilliant. So we’ve dealt with content, we’ve dealt with the team, we’ve dealt with skills, as in in terms of where we need to be with our skill set or we don’t necessarily need to be with our skill set as well, any other biggies I just want to come back to a couple of things with team members okay, yeah, absolutely, let’s circle back.

Dr. James: 

This is free freestyle.

Dr. Bobby: 

So let’s do that. A couple of nuggets that I’ve learned over the last year and a half. The first one is toxic high performers.

Dr. James: 

So the cristiano ronaldo’s? Oh, sorry, not to name names.

Dr. Bobby: 

What I mean by that is is that you will end up with people in your business who are actually very, very good at a specific role, but they they know they are and they don’t do any good for anybody else in your business, and as good as they can be at that particular role, it can destroy your business. So my number one tip is is that if you have somebody like that in your business or turns out like that, you have to get that in your business or turns out like that, you have to get rid as fast as possible.

 

Dr. James: 

Yeah, without a doubt, because it is no good having one like that, but then the rest of a team who are dysfunctional as a result of that yeah, kind of reminds me of a practice that I used to work in, uh in the day, but I won’t be in this because this is the thing. If they’re like that, it actually does drag morale down and it actually inhibits yes, they know their stuff, but it inhibits the learning that others can benefit from in terms of being able to approach them for their expertise, because they’re just not willing to do that because of their personality, potentially yeah, no, no, 100.

Dr. Bobby: 

And then the second thing I would add to that is um, yeah, we took an apprentice recently from another practice and she was really, really unhappy in that practice. Um, she wasn’t looked after very well, wasn’t trained adequately and she was just absolutely in tears when she came through the agency. And she’s been here and she’s doing really well. And it’s a conversation that I’ve had with a few people recently about apprentices leaving practices instantly after their apprenticeships are finished and about why some of the team members have come to work in this practice over other practices, and a lot of it has come down to the culture of that practice and what those practices have built.

Dr. Bobby: 

A lot of dental practices say that they struggle with recruitment and they can’t retain staff, but I think when you look around in dentistry, one of the biggest issues is that, unfortunately, team members have not been looked after. So you know I’m not saying you know you’ve got to do everything you know under the sun to keep them happy. But I think there has been a certain amount of neglect in the profession over principles, in supporting the team and their well-being and their development and their career pathways and their opportunities, and I think that’s another one of the reasons, you know why, um, our team have been so good, you know, and why they’ve come to work here awesome man.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, it’s, it’s. I think there’s accountability on both sides, is what you’re saying, right?

Dr. James: 

100 both sides. Yeah, cool, cool, cool, cool, cool. All right, awesome. So let’s go to the dentistry side of things once again, and this is something that I wanted to ask because I was just curious. So obviously we’ve got associate led and then we’ve got principal led practice, as in the principal is actively doing clinical dentistry. Do you feel that it’s best to have a plan at the start if you wanna make yourself associate-led, or are you best off just starting the practice and then figuring it out as you go along? What’s your thoughts on that? Because the thing is, if you plan too much, it can impede things and there’s so many more moving parts when it comes to the associate-led thing that you might just never get off the ground. Is what I’m getting at.

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah, it’s a really, really interesting question. So I think there’s a few different factors that come into play with this. So I think the first thing is it depends. Number one, how much do you enjoy clinical dentistry? So there are some dentists who want to open squat practices because they genuinely love dentistry, but they just want to do it for themselves and they want to have their own way of doing things, which is fine, and you know you’d end up with essentially a lifestyle business. Uh, you know, you have a small practice, you run it, you’re working it clinically, you build a small team around you absolutely nothing wrong with that if that’s what you want. Um, for me, the long term is to have an associate ledled practice and I just have the option then of doing the dentistry that I want to do. So, you know, in a position in a few years, I would just like to be the person who turns up and I get to do what I want to do. Whatever implant work I choose to do end up and everything else is just well managed and well run and survives on its own, and then you can go and essentially repeat that formula elsewhere.

Dr. Bobby: 

But one of the things I would say for people who are saying that squat practice is. To set a squat practice up that’s fully associate, led from the beginning for majority of dentists is not easy because unless you’ve worked with those associates, you know what they can grow, you know how they’re going to treat your patients, you know that they can convert or you’ve put a step in between that. So you’ve got a tco that does that for them, so you don’t have to worry about the dentist being able to sell treatments. Uh, it’s very difficult to monitor that. And the second, the third thing sorry is is that cash flow. So if you’re a principal led uh squat practice, you can build your cash flow a lot quicker and build your cash balance a lot quicker than if you’re an associate-led business from day one. So for me it’s easier to have a principal-led business where you can build your cash buffer, then introduce associates and transition into an associate-led business. But I just think it’s more difficult to do it the other way around.

Dr. James: 

First, yeah, plus getting the exact right team from the outset. Oh my god, that can not be easy. That is going to be a hard process, right? Have you ever seen anybody pull it off successfully?

Dr. Bobby: 

uh, I don’t actually know, not off the top of my head. I mean, I know people that do it successfully now, but it’s all gone through a process of where they were the principals doing all the dentistry and then it’s transitioned. So I don’t can’t think of anyone that’s really successfully right from the outset, straight off the bat. Yeah, I mean the two most successful ones. I can think of my old principal and obviously Amit Jilka, who you know really well. Both of those were heavily principal-led practices that transitioned into that, using their mentorship and guidance in building the associates.

Dr. James: 

There we go. Good stuff, just curious because for a lot of people associate-led is a dream. But I was talking to an accountant not terribly long ago and he said in his experience and remember he’s coming at this from a place of context he was saying that in his experience about 10, only 10% of practices are actually associate-led, which I’m surprised.

Dr. Bobby: 

I don’t know the actual figures, but I wouldn’t be surprised, but I guess that’s not including corporates, obviously.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, all associate led. Do you know what I mean? But I think that’s outside of corporates is what he was referring to yeah, I wouldn’t be surprised. I wouldn’t be surprised, to be fair this sounds quite right, because I thought that’s not. I mean, obviously I’m not doubting his figures, but I was just surprised that it was as low, so I was just cross-checking.

Dr. Bobby: 

Yeah well, if you think about it, I mean even all the guys that I’m teaching mentoring, all the guys who set up there and girls who set up their own squats. At the moment, all of them are predominantly principle-led, so not a single one of them really want to do it to be associate-led businesses initially. Uh, every single one of them want to do it for themselves and they actually all enjoy dentistry, which is interesting, all right there you go interesting and you know what that’s actually generated a really good question in my head.

Dr. James: 

What you’ve just said. So, obviously, in your experience of mentoring dentists whenever it comes to setting up their own squats, you’ve covered some really good, valuable stuff today in terms of things that we need to know, in terms of we need to think of squat hacks, so to speak, to make the ultimate squat as we turn this podcast earlier. But what I want to know is when you’re mentoring people in the field, okay, what are the common misconceptions they have? Do you like Instagram versus reality? Right? Yeah, the common misconceptions they have. Do you like instagram versus reality? Right? Yeah, what is like their squats in their head versus squat reality? What are the differences? What are the big learning points for them?

Dr. Bobby: 

I’m just curious to know yeah, so biggest one, number one is the cost of starting a practice um, that’s definitely number one is always, always underestimatedimated and when quotes come in, generally it’s more expensive than what they thought it was going to be. The second biggest is the time demand and the expectation that they can work six days as an associate and set a squat at the same time as a big misconception. You know, if you’re about to build something you know for your future, you have to allocate some time towards it. You can’t be in surgery six days a week not being able to answer your phone, take calls, do viewings, whatever it is. You have to allocate some space in your life to allow that to happen.

Dr. Bobby: 

So that’s another big one. Right from the outset, um, yeah, right from right from the outset. And I think the the other one is once it’s open. Uh, exactly what we just talked about. So predominantly, most the most common thing is the team, and people have the expectation that the team is going to be the dream team from day one. It does not work like that. It does not work like that, it does not work like that Instagram versus reality.

Dr. James: 

Again, it’s exactly analogous to that, and actually that’s because you see a lot of stuff on Instagram and it’s like if you’re pushing too hard, you’re doing it wrong, and things like that, and I like that mindset whenever it comes to how can we say, um, you know, just making us reflect and understand that life doesn’t constantly have to be hard, but sometimes the stuff just needs doing, the doing just needs doing. Do you know what I mean?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah, that’s exactly it. With a squat, you know, there is a period where you’ve got to grind, no matter what.

Dr. James: 

Uh, it’s as simple as that hashtag, grind set, hashtag set, something like that. Respect, well, this is, this is, this is the thing you know? Is I think that, um, yeah, focusing it, because here’s the thing, the only one thing about the word grind is someone might actually enjoy the whole process, are you with me, right? Whereas grind suggests that it has to be difficult. Are you with me? Do you know what I mean? So, yeah, what I?

Dr. James: 

I like the term when it comes to starting a business. I like the term focus. Right, you have to be focused. Yeah, now, that may require energy or it may be easy for you. It may be the grind or it may be smooth, are you with me? But it certainly requires a period of focus. But here’s the thing I think that past a certain point as to when that point is difficult, say, past a certain point, actually it becomes more about delegating and thinking how you can take yourself out of your business. There is a period of time that elapses at which stage it can become optional to you if you have the right knowledge and the right mindset. It’s not always immediately at the beginning, at least that’s my belief. Set, listen, I’ve never set up a squat, but when it comes to business. It pretty much applies to all businesses no, I agree with that completely.

Dr. Bobby: 

And the point you made about focus is is too right. Um, yeah, everything requires focus and you know, one of the biggest things with setting up a squat is it’s very hard to lose focus because there’s so many moving parts and there’s so many different things that need doing. So, you know, the way I try and teach is is that we break everything down so you don’t need to worry about the next bit until this bit’s finished. You know you allocate your focus appropriately. So, rather than having, you know, 10 different tabs open in your head at any one time, you’ve just got the one you focus, you get that one done and then you move on to the next one and you just keep that focus rolling over, and then the same when you set the practice up. You know it’s just focus, focus, focus, but knowing where to allocate it and not spreading it over too thin love it.

Dr. James: 

And when it comes to allocating allocating a big part of that is delegating right. Any tips on that?

Dr. Bobby: 

100. Delegating is one of the hardest things that dentists find to do, me included. We are control freaks. We literally want to control everything. Uh, my team still say about me to this day um, but it does get easier. The more you do it, the more you do it.

Dr. Bobby: 

You know you get to a certain point in, especially in a squat where you might not know everybody, you might not know all of your team that you’re starting with. So it can be a bit harder for that element of trust and delegation to know that everything’s being done. But what will happen is you know over that period of six to twelve that everything’s being done. But what will happen is you know over that period of six to 12 months, everything will fall into place. Everybody will kind of get to grips. You’ll know how everybody works. And when you hit that spot it’s so much easier than to delegate because you’ve got the trust of everybody. You know it’s going to get done, and it’s a lot easier than to pass everything on. And the other key thing is having enough people to delegate to makes sense.

Dr. James: 

You got to have the team in order to delegate to the team, sort of thing. You know, I’ve got a really uh nice acronym that I learned recently on the topic of delegation ohio. Just like the american state, ohio only handle it once.

Dr. Bobby: 

I like that yeah, I like that that plays in my head a lot.

Dr. James: 

Only handle it once. If it’s delegatable, then ohio it effectively, and if you want a really good, do you know what I’m actually gonna ask you a question right now have you ever read the e-myth? I have yes yeah, okay, I’m a huge fan. What are your thoughts on the e-myth and do you think it’s relevant to people setting up a squad?

Dr. Bobby: 

yeah, yeah, 100%, yeah, 100%. It’s relevant um you know, it’s um the principles outlined in that.

Dr. James: 

You know what we should be aiming for if you haven’t read it, anybody who’s listening and you want to own a business. It’ll change your life big time.

Dr. James: 

And you know what I almost put. I feel like it was one of those books because I’ve mingled with a lot of people who’ve read it that I almost felt like I’d passively absorbed the wisdom from it and, in fairness, when I read it, I think I’d probably heard like 60% of it just from having conversations with people. But there was that little 40% in there that I hadn’t come across yet. That just really put the cherry on the cake and it rounded off what I previously knew. That little 40% had like 80% of the value, just because it completed everything inside my head. So I really recommend it. I love that book, man. And and obviously, uh, have you ever read? Uh, I’ve talked about who, not how loads in this podcast. I’m not going to bang on about that again, because I always do. In fact, I’m pretty sure I talked about it on our podcast.

Dr. Bobby: 

I still haven’t read it, actually, but one of the dentists that I’m mentoring read it recently and he told me to read it and he got it from you, yeah that’s hilarious from you.

Dr. James: 

Yeah, that’s hilarious. I know who he is. I know who he is, uh, yeah, because we actually talked about it like two weeks ago, me and that guy. Um, so yeah, that’s a killer book. And then also another one I read recently checklist manifesto by atul gawande I believe it’s pronounced uh, checklist manifesto and emith. Okay, both really good books. You read them together it’s like put them five times the value, because they actually fit in with each other really nicely yeah, checklist manifest.

Dr. Bobby: 

Okay, that um often. The book came up a lot while I was doing my implant training quite some years ago. Um, and about the use of checklists, you know, in surgery yeah, important any more book recommendations uh, no, I still need to work my way through yours.

Dr. James: 

I’m like that. I kind of I’m like a vampire for people’s time whenever it comes to books. It is like I throw books at people and they’re kind of like trying to play catch up a little bit because I love to read, man, like it’s.

Dr. Bobby: 

There’s so many cool things that you can learn yeah, one of the things I’m reading at the moment, to be fair, is actually 100 million. Leads by alex formosi I gotta read that so it’s actually very simple, but it’s actually great about marketing and the principles and that can be applied to anything. Yeah, dental practices, whatever it is, um, but yeah, no, it’s a great great read.

Dr. James: 

You know what I’d love to read that book and do a podcast about it. I really need to do that actually I definitely would.

Dr. Bobby: 

I think people will find it very valuable yeah top stuff.

Dr. James: 

Bobby, we’re coming up to the 45 minute mark, which is usually where we round off these podcasts. Any parting words of wisdom from yourself?

Dr. Bobby: 

uh, no. The final thing I would just say is that if it’s something that you’re thinking of doing and you want to set up your own practice, you know for me it’s definitely one of the most rewarding and fulfilling things that I have ever done in my life and you know I absolutely have no regrets. Don’t get me wrong. There are days where it’s really tough, really hard. Sometimes you wish you think why did you bother? Uh.

Dr. Bobby: 

But then you know, predominantly 19% of the time, it is is blissful when you start seeing these big treatments coming through, when you start doing full-arch stuff and life-changing things, and you just sit back and think I created the practice for this to happen. And where would that patient have gone if they hadn’t come here and would they have got the same level of care and service? It’s a nice feeling to have that you know, to know that you created that for them. Um, and you know that’s one of the things that keeps me going. You know, money aside, that’s just one aspect, but you know that fulfillment that you get from it. You know you can’t get that in everything and we’re lucky we can.

Dr. James: 

I love that, bro, straight from the heart. What a nice note to end this podcast on bobby. You’ve been super generous with your time. As usual, guys, it’s been a real pleasure to present this hope everybody listening got loads of value. I’ll see you on the next episode very soon.

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