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Dentists Who Invest

Podcast Episode

Full Transcript

Dr James: 

Fans of the Dentists who Invest podcast. If you feel like there was one particular episode in the back catalog in the anthology of Dentists who Invest podcast episodes that really, really, really was massively valuable to you, feel free to share that with a fellow dental colleague who’s in a similar position, so their understanding of finance can be elevated and they can hit the next level of financial success in their life. Also, as well as that, if you could take two seconds to rate and review this podcast, it would mean the world. To me, what that would mean is that it drives this podcast further in terms of reach so that more dentists across the world can be able to benefit from the knowledge contained therein. Welcome.

Devang: 

Welcome to the Dentists who Invest podcast.

Dr James: 

What is up everybody? Welcome back to another exciting episode of the Dentists who Invest podcast, and I am sat across the Zoom table if that is a thing from an esteemed gentleman in the dental world who, I know for a fact, has a very good profile and lots of people know about him because of his abilities in the dental world. But also we’re here to talk about his philosophy on accruing wealth, and it is a powerful message. It is a useful message, it is something that everybody needs to hear, and the gentleman I’m sat opposite his name is Devang Patel and I’m very pleased to have him on the show today to talk about what we’re going to talk about. How are you, devang?

Devang: 

I am very well and thank you very much, James, for such a nice introduction and thanks for inviting me here.

Dr James: 

Oh dude, my pleasure Anytime. So, dev, for people who are in the dental world, who don’t necessarily know yourself, or who have yet to meet you or come across you, maybe it might be nice to do a little bit of an introduction, just to explain who you are, what you do and what we’re here to talk about today.

Devang: 

So hi everyone, I’m Devang Patel. I’m a restorative and implantologist, so I do mainly full-martric constructions and all sorts of implant work autogenous bone grafting, sinus lifts, full-arch implants and I see patients on a referral basis. I work in Devang and Lechwa, so two wide areas, and I live in London, so a lot of travelling and that gives me a lot of time to ponder about and help other dentists, which I love to do. I also have been teaching at UCL, at Eastman Dental Institute, since 2011, 2012. Yeah, so I teach and I work really good combination.

Dr James: 

Awesome. And Dev, just to go back a little further, because I know your personal story, don’t I? Because we’re involved in a few circles together which are somewhat related to dentistry, but also more on the business side, and you know what I think would be awesome to share it. You know when you spoke about it, when you told your story on that course that day about how you came from India all the way over to the UK and you had to learn dentistry trial by fire, effectively in the UK. I would love to hear that again because that was awesome and I feel like there’ll be lots of people out here in the audience who’ll connect with you if they could hear that. Would you mind sharing that, because I thought that was cool?

Devang: 

Oh yeah, so I basically graduated in India and in 2004 did my international qualifying examination. At that point there were three parts, so I gave the examination, passed the exam and started working in the UK in 2006, on the day when the UDA system was launched. So you know, I was the first, one of the first dentists who just started without knowing how the old system worked, so started UDA system I worked in. I used to do 9000 UDAs a year because it was a predominantly NHS practice and worked for six years and, as everyone you know does, I mean I invested a lot. I did two, three restorative certificate courses, did my MJDF, did other CPD events and courses and an ultimate goal was at that time to become a private dentist where I can just leave NHS and work into private practice, and I thought the only way to do that is to do masters or to become a specialist. I didn’t have money to take three years of work and to become a specialist, so I decided to do next best thing, which is MSc conservative dentistry from Eastman Dental Hospital and that is a very unique program where you work as much as you want and the hospital was open for 7.30 in the morning till 11 and we treated our patients, but at the same time we did all our own lab work. So if I prepare a crown, I would restore, I would wax up the crown, cast the crown polish, finish porcelain, whatever, and then fit the crown in patients mouth. So the whole circle is done by me and it’s a good thing because you get a lot of ideas to where you’re going wrong and why technicians not being able to give you a good quality work back. So I used to. I mean now I really worked hard. I worked there. I used to be there every day in the morning, 7.30 and 11 o’clock. I would go out in the evening, including weekends. So I used to work seven days, patients only seen in the weekdays. But because you see, patients create a lot of lab work which we need to do. So I did that over the weekend and, you know, did a lot of full-month reconstructions and that’s when really I appreciated the value of mentoring, because I knew or had all the knowledge and so I did all the courses and everything before I had knowledge of full-month reconstruction. But until someone sits next to you and, you know, tells you what’s going wrong with yourself but with your technique, the way you’re implementing what you know, it’s very difficult to speed up your progress. So you know, I did a lot of implants, I restored implants and it was yeah, it was very fun. Fun. One year hard work, but fun. I was given best student of the year prize and I passed with distinction and it was really good and I really enjoyed it. So when I came out I thought, okay, you know what I am on the top of the world, you know people will be lining to you know, give me jobs. But unfortunately that wasn’t the case. I applied for a lot of jobs. I didn’t get any Because I guess I was in the middle, I wasn’t specialist and I was a general dentist. So then I went back to my friends practice. I did a couple of jobs in between one day and a prior practice here and there. Then I went back to my friends practice working in the National Health Mixed Dental Practice, because I didn’t have money again, because after finishing the course I was broke. The only thing I was doing is I was teaching, which I loved. So I was teaching at Eastman Dental Institute and messing with the Dental Practice Program, dental, and I was a program coordinator for that as well, and I was also deputy head examiner for ORE, which is similar to IQ exam. So tables were turned. One time I did IQ exam and now I was the examiner for the same exam, which was a nerve-wracking experience and I can see why people are so nervous and you know I can relate to that environment. Really All that, as you said, when I came to UK I was struggling to speak and you know, my English wasn’t very good. Many people say that someone pointed out that it’s not still good, so I’m still improving, but yeah, so, going back to working, so my friend gave me a break in mixed practices and I started working. He taught me really how to communicate with patients. He gave me opportunity to go around his practices and see referral patients, and that’s what I did and since 2018 now, I’m just doing patients on a referral basis and seeing, doing complex cases, which is really good, and I think if I don’t go, if I wouldn’t have gone through that journey, I wouldn’t have become the dentist I am because, throughout that I did after my MSc, I went to what I decide. What he told me, actually, which is very good, he’s like look, if you want to learn a skill, you need to learn from the best, who is the best, and it doesn’t matter whether you have to go, wherever you have to go, just go there and then learn from them. So I want you to learn a Kuri technique. So I went to Germany and learned from him. I went twice, because one time is not enough. So I went twice and then one of his assistant professor was assisting me while I’m doing surgery, so I got one to one mentoring from him. I learned root canal treatment from John West, who invented pro taper files. So I went to San Francisco, did the course from him. I did period on period course for implants from Otis and Heusler from Munich. So I went everywhere, did all the courses. I felt, you know I’m a very good 360 degree dentist. And then, after doing all dentistry everything involved also peri-endo, whatever you name it I did everything and I still do everything. But then I decided, okay, I want to narrow down my skills. And then I chose to do just full-malt reconstructions and implants, and that’s what I do now.

Dr James: 

Wow, you know. And to come from where you were, you know, you’re still only 39. That’s the crazy thing, you know. That sounds like the CV of someone who’s 60. Are you with me? So fair play, you know. And it just shows you, you know, if you just double down on investing yourself, how far you can go in a certain you know, in that amount of time. And it’s fair to say, you came to England. It wasn’t like you had a silver spoon in your mouth. There was a few times when money was tight and you still got to this position. So I think that’s quite remarkable really, you know, and it goes to show that if you can excel and get to where you are you personally, then that’s inspiring for anybody. So, yeah, awesome. And that’s why I wanted to get you on the podcast, because this platform is about investing not just financially in the world’s outside of your own head, but also within your own head as well, because that knowledge and that investment also compounds. It just compounds in a different way, which leads very nicely on to what we were speaking about today, which is the four pillars of investment, and Dev and I were talking off camera, just before this podcast happened, about these four pillars of investment, and Dev has an amazing philosophy which I really, really wanted to give a platform to and to share with the world, because I know that there’ll be people out there listening today who it will ignite and who it will inspire. So therefore, dev, I’m going to pass the mic over to you once more so that we can speak, or so that you may speak, on the four pillars of philosophy and you can share with those, with the audience, what they are, how they work and how they’ve helped you.

Devang: 

Well, thank you very much, James, for again those kind words. And look, I’m not an investment guru. You are so, but I have a different philosophy and my investment philosophies is a little bit different. It’s not about money, it’s about people. So I’ve broken down investment levels into four levels Invest, investing in yourself, investing for yourself, investing for others and investing in others. So let me explain all these four pillars. So, investing in yourself so before you start investing anything, you need to really invest in yourself, and that’s what I did. I can only relate to dentistry. So that’s what I did in the beginning. I really invested. I spent, although I didn’t have much money, I spent all what I had in courses and doing further education to grow myself so that I am capable to invest for myself. And when it comes to investing for myself, you are the experts. You look into stocks, bitcoin, different things. You can do that for you. Then you can invest for your family and friends and then, once you reach that level where you have invested for others, you need to then start investing in others, which means and that’s what I’ve started doing now. So I’ve created a group called Full Math Reconstruction for GDPs on Facebook. That’s where I share all the tricks and tips of Full Math Reconstruction, because that’s one way of me giving my time and my effort to the community back and helping others one to one is another way, because someone told me that let’s say, if you have a 50 billion pounds and should give 1 million pounds as a charity, and if you have, let’s say, 1.2 million pound, and if you give 1 million pound to charity, that’s a huge difference because you’re short of something you’re still giving away. And for me, I sat down and I thought you know what? What I am short of is time. But if I give away my time to someone, that’s the best charity I can do and that’s selfless, because I really need my time and but I am giving it to someone else and that’s called investing in others. And so you always start investing in yourself because you can’t reach level four until you finish your level one, level two and you’re comfortable with level three, and then you do level four. Where you are, you’re investing in others because you have something to give back to community, and that’s what I’m all about. So if you, if any dentist trying to progress through the career, I would always, always advise them to invest in yourself, like I did, and it worked out okay for me. And you know sometimes it’s hard. It’s hard times because you know, usually when you’re investing in yourself, money is tight, because you know you’re not at that level and you know you have doubts whether it’s a good thing to do but or not. But you know whether it’s a good investor or bad. If it’s for yourself, in within yourself, then it’s always good investment because you either learn or you succeed, you know so it’s one way or the other. There is no failure because you know, even if you get spurs, you learn not to do things. How to not to do? It’s hard way to learn it, but you know it’s one way to learn that thing. But yeah, so these are essentially four pillars of investing my way.

Dr James: 

That’s cool, you know what? Here’s the thing about me when I’ve done dipped in course, I’ve done a few other courses in dentistry and I only ever did it. I only ever did courses when someone else pushed me or coerced me into it. And if I would have just did it off my own back, I would have seen that knowledge compound so much more and so much sooner. And actually that’s something I want to touch on just super briefly, because when I say knowledge compounds, what I mean is everybody knows an invest in that when you invest, your money gradually grows until eventually it takes off exponentially. And knowledge is like that as well, because the simple stuff that you learn at the start, the more you learn and learn and learn, the more you connect the dots as time goes on and actually, when it gets to the point that you’re further down the line, you become the expert teeny little tiny bits of knowledge that you add on to your knowledge base because you connect them with so many other individual parts of knowledge that you have prior, prior to that point, accumulated. What that means is that even adding one little tiny bit of information means that you gain exponentially more than the next person because you’ve already studied that in depth, and that’s something I really like. Is that something you’ve come across, dev? It’s an interesting way of looking at it.

Devang: 

It is very interesting way of looking at it. I haven’t come across it, but I can completely relate to that because it just compares when you think I’m doing all this, I’m doing all the time all this and when the dots going to connect. But as someone said, the dot always connects in the past. You cannot connect dots in the future. So now the dots are connecting, I’ve spent all that time. Although I don’t do Endo anymore, I still have the knowledge. The other day I went, one of the associates came back and she stopped with the root canal and just went there and opened the canal for her. So you know it’s a molar, so it’s. I still feel like I got it and it’s good to know that I can help someone you know with those skills.

Dr James: 

Yeah and yeah, awesome, brilliant, top stuff. And then, like I was saying, as I was saying just a second ago as well, I only ever did. I only ever pursued these courses. I only ever did them. If my principal or somebody else said to me James, you have to do it, that’s the point in your being here. I never really did it off my own back. Ok, now some people will be listening to this and they’ll be. They might have that outside influence. Who’s pushing them in the right direction? Those people who need to be inspired to go and learn. If you could go back and speak to well, actually, no, let me rephrase that, because younger Dev had this already, so he didn’t need anybody to have words with them. But let’s imagine there’s somebody out there today and they need a little bit of coercion to start investing themselves to do dental courses. What would you say to those people? What are they? What are you seeing, having come out the other side, that they’re not necessarily seeing, try to put yourself in their shoes.

Devang: 

I think, james, what it does is that it opens up a lot many doors. So if I want to invest now, if I want a new loops, I don’t have to think about money. If I want to invest into all, my investment is dentistry related. Fortunately, I’m sad, but if I want to go away I mean, I’m not a holiday person, but let’s say, if I want to go away, I don’t want to have to think about money yet. So, with investing in yourself and doing those courses and everything, a if you’re planning to do dentistry for a long term, obviously A I think it’s good for your patients and it’s patient deserves best from ourselves. But B it will give you that flexibility to do quality dentistry, because I see many dentists who don’t like dentistry or they’re frustrated. It’s not because they don’t like dentistry or they’re frustrated with dentistry. Many times they’re frustrated with the system. They’re frustrated with the environment they’re in, they’re frustrated with the mundane work day in, day out. They could just go clean the teeth, do the filling. So for me, whenever I get bored, I go and do another course Because I always learn something new and it just keeps me going. And so people who are really thinking about whether to invest in courses or not. I would look into doing it like two reasons. One is just to keep the dentistry spiced up so you learn something new, get excited. You come back and book another course, maybe a couple of months or a few months later, straight away, so you look forward to that course. There’s something professionally you’re improving on and also it gives you another vehicle to fulfill your other needs. When you do the courses, obviously you improve your quality of dentistry and inevitably you get remunerated for that and with that you can spend that on things what you need and you get less stress because of that. So two ways, yeah. So for me it’s a more motivational thing as well as generating income.

Dr James: 

Yeah, 110%. Well, there’s a saying that I love, and it is you don’t know what you don’t know. You literally cannot fathom what is outside of your head, what information is out there, until you begin to learn about it, and I see so many. I think that it’s common in dentistry that people feel stuck in a rut in their career, and the thing about dentistry is it always blew my mind. You know we’re talking about from here to here, so from the base of your nose to the bottom of your chin and what’s inside your mouth. Yet there is just so much stuff out there, like the amount of information just is unending and complex, and there’s so much to it, so there’s always gonna be more to learn. So I suppose it’s about rolling the dice, immersing yourself in that environment where you feel like there’s gonna be something that’s gonna bring another dimension to it, and then implementing it in your dentistry itself. And I used to get really excited when I learned something from another course because I could take it and I could implement it the next day. And that was the cool thing about dentistry and we’ve also said the E word a few time exciting, that’s what life should be about. You know, before it’s money before it’s anything else. We’ve only got so much time on this earth. Every moment that we spend not being excited and not having fun is time that we don’t get back. There’s no rehearsals in this life, and that in itself is a reason, in essence, for me to do that, even on its own, even before we talk about anything else, and I just think that’s a really nice way of looking at things and that’s my philosophy as well. So, dev, you spoke about learning, you spoke about dentists, you spoke about your own path and also what route you went down and all the courses that you’ve done and all the rest, let’s say in the audience. You also own practices as well, so there’ll be some dentists out there who thinking about taking the leap to own their own practice. Where would you.

Devang: 

Sorry, I don’t own practice. I’m an associate, I work, I visit practices.

Dr James: 

Sorry, oh, sorry I visit practices.

Devang: 

I think I feel that if I would have owned the practice, maybe I wouldn’t have been able to do progression in this way, because my progress is very focused on educating myself, developing skills. I have not invested anything into business or time, money, anything. All my investment went into improving my skills and getting better at it and practicing those skills and I feel that maybe that may have benefited me a little bit. And that’s why I feel that the associates are in a good position, because they don’t have this worry about staff, especially now staff recruiting. Staff is nightmare and if someone’s off for COVID or not, it’s just. I feel that right now it’s a privilege to be an associate and if you’re an associate you are in a best position really to learn the skills and improve and hone it before you buy your own practice. So you are really set that when any patient comes through your practice you know that you can deal with them. And I think for me being an associate was a blessing really and I’m glad I didn’t buy the practice till yet.

Dr James: 

Real quick, guys. I put together a special report for Dentist entitled the Seven Costs and Potentially Disasters Mistakes that Dentists make whenever it comes to their finances. Most of the time, Dentists are going through these issues and they don’t even necessarily realize that they’re happening until they have their eyes opened, and that is the purpose of this report. You can go ahead and receive your free report by heading on over to wwwdentistuneinvestcom forward slash podcast report or, alternatively, you can download it using the link in the description. This report details the seven most common issues. However, most importantly, it also shows you how to fix them Really. Looking forwards to hearing your thoughts. Okay, my mistake, I thought you owned a dental practice. Okay, let’s flip this question on its head then. In that case, why is it Now? You’ve already summarized this just now. I know that you want to remain an associate, et cetera. What would you say? There’ll be people out there who want to buy practice because they think it’s their only path to wealth. That is such a misconception. That is a massive misconception. There are so many avenues open to you and, just like what we were saying over earlier, you don’t know what you don’t know. So you yourself, Dev, you’ve invested money in growing. I know that you don’t have a practice, but you have got other businesses simmering on the side. What other potential avenues are open to those associates who feel like they’re very blinkered and that their only path to success and wealth is owning a dental practice? What other options do they have that they’re not seeing?

Devang: 

I feel that it depends. If I’m not a quite clinical person, so I never was interested in owning a practice. I never say never. So maybe one day, maybe, who knows. But maybe if I’m opening a teaching institute, that’s different, because teaching is my passion. And with regards to the dentist who feel that owning the practice is the only way to progress in the career, I would certainly say yes, it’s one of the way to do that, because you can then leverage. So you can leverage other dentists, other people, and you can get progress more. But, as you were saying in your last podcast, so there are three ways of leveraging and one of the ways is educating, creating content. So if you’re an associate and if you have got that skill, then you can use your remuneration. Whatever you have knowledge or money, because I would consider knowledge as a remuneration as well, because when you work, when you gather all this knowledge, you come up with your own idea and your own knowledge, so it’s quite bespoke to you. So when you have this knowledge and remuneration, you can then invest that into other parts. So, money you’re doing amazing job in helping dentists, in investing into different sources, but Bitcoin or any other financial sources Education, if you have, if your knowledge of education, then you can educate other dentists and do what you love. So, rather than owning the practice, I’ve seen a lot of people who are successful associates, and the number is growing, because running a practice is hard work, especially nowadays. But practice owners will not go back and become associates, so they both love what they do. But I personally feel that just because you’re an associate, it doesn’t mean that you’re limited in your capabilities and you can certainly invest in other sources to generate income. But even I feel that you’re more flexible because you can do other things, whereas if you’re a practice owner, then you’re quite focused into one business.

Dr James: 

You know, here’s the thing There’ll be lots of people out there listening today who genuinely have a massive passion for being a principal dentist, and that’s totally fine. There’ll be people out there who have no interest in being a principal dentist, which is also totally fine. But then there’ll be a group of people in the middle who feel like they want to push themselves to excel in so far as they become more financially successful and they genuinely feel like being a principal dentist is the only means to do that. I know for a fact there are people out there like that, and we’re speaking to the people in the middle that perhaps some of those people will be correct, the correct people to be a principal dentist. But actually it’s worth exploring these other options before you maybe take on a huge amount of debt to get a practice, because there’s no way, once you’ve got that, you’ve got that and you’re locked in effectively, or it’s going to certainly be difficult to get rid of. So those are the people that I like to speak to as well, and I just say you know what? Because that’s part of the message of Dentist who Invest, where I say actually, guys, there’s other ways that you can do this if you wish to, and those three methods of leverage that you were talking about earlier, dev. Just for anybody who’s listening, it’s the human method, the cash method and also the content method, and basically I could spend about 20 minutes explaining those. It’s probably a little bit more time than what we’ve got for today, but basically, if you want to become wealthy, you have to pick one of those three methods, and it’s worth knowing what they are so that you can be educated and know which path that you’re on, because if the path that you’re on misaligns with your goals and what you enjoy in life, then well, that’s not so fun and life’s about being excited and having fun along the way, because you don’t get this time back and there’s no rehearsals, which is a billion-way of drawing a line under everything that we’ve just said.

Devang: 

Yeah, 100% and, as I said, I echo you. Really, if you’re an associate and you feel that you must buy a practice, I don’t think that’s. There are so many ways to become independent without buying a practice and enjoy your life. I mean, you don’t have to buy a practice to be successful.

Dr James: 

And actually something’s just popped into my head as well. I actually shot a podcast a little bit of content with Andrew Acton not terribly long ago from off the top of my head, I think it was about four or five episodes ago and it was called Is Owning a Dental Practice for Me? So that’s definitely worth checking out. Anybody who’s teetering on the brink about making that decision, dev, you have On the topic of leveraging yourself via media you hinted at this just a minute ago You’ve got your Facebook group, which is centered around dentists who want to become better at full-morth rehabs, and this is something that actually a lot I don’t think is actually taught well enough by anybody out there who’s running courses at the minute. I genuinely think that I genuinely think there’s a big gap in the market to improve on that. I know that there are courses in my experience that teach the theory, but, like we were talking earlier about dentistry, there’s so much more depth to it and there’s so much value in having mentorship on it, which is something I believe definitely could be improved on in this country. That’s what your group is addressing, and it’ll be interesting to hear a little bit more about that, because I think I’m going to join.

Devang: 

Oh, thank you, James, thanks for again kind words. So I actually created Pathway to Full-Morth Reconstruction because I was a VT trainer for one of the dentists and after she finished training with me, within a year she started doing full-morth reconstruction and I just felt that you know, if she can do it, why not? Everyone else is doing it Because ultimately there are enough patients to go around. I think what’s happening is because dentists are overwhelmed from the system, but also they’re underconfident that they cannot do full-morth reconstruction and lots of patients are not being treated properly and my aim is to really make sure that patient gets good care but at the same time, by doing full-morth reconstruction it’s different. You know the satisfaction you get, your job satisfaction you get by doing full-morth reconstruction is completely different than just doing one-class, one-restoration and you know, many times you change people’s lives and that’s what gets me. So I was thinking about that and I created a full-morth reconstruction pathway. The pathway is because I again echo you as well that you know I didn’t see any program, because there are lots of implant programs where there is mentoring available, where you know implantologists come to your practice and I did that as well. I do implant, I did implant mentoring as well for a lot of dentists and I used to go there and help them out but there is no mentoring for restorative dentistry, you know. So I created a pathway where there is an online course on full-morth reconstruction. If someone’s done online course, which all the contents for adhesive, you know, direct full-morth reconstruction, is in there. If someone’s done that course and they say, look, you know what, this is good, I can do full-morth reconstruction, that’s great. If someone’s done that course and then they’re like, oh no, I need a little bit more information specific to my sort of situation. Then I do hands-on course, where they would come and do hands-on practical for six days various things occlusion and mounting and, you know, bonding and everything related to full-morth reconstruction and I will then take them through one to one case discussion of their cases. Because, again, there are a lot of courses where the materials have been delivered and then there is no support afterwards. Yes, there are WhatsApp groups, but that’s not really. That’s not it. You need one to one support and that’s what I provide after a hands-on course. And then, let’s say, someone’s planned the case, they’re still not confident that this is my first case. I want someone to come to my practice, then I would go to that practice and get them through doing that first case. So the plan is, whoever comes out this whole system, they will come out in various levels but they will come out becoming a full-morth reconstructive dentist. And to help people who are not in the, you know, haven’t done the course or can’t do the course for some reason or the other, I’ve created a Facebook group called Full-Morth Reconstruction for GDPs where I’m putting on free information for people to improve their knowledge of full-morth reconstruction. I mean, it’s very difficult to teach from you know full-mathric instruction on a Facebook group, but I’m adding information and content. So it helps and it sort of keeps the thinking going of dentists and hopefully, if not with me, they will do some other courses and help themselves to do this full-mathric instruction. Because I mean, if you imagine, if you’re doing 10 crowns on a 10 different patients or you’re doing 10 crowns on the same patient, the effort is less because you’re communicating with just one patient, you’re seeing just one patient and this is another way to obviously increase your remuneration, as we were talking about. So use that as an investment.

Dr James: 

Awesome. So, yeah, 110% agree. There’s so many implant tutors out there and they’re good. You know. There’s nothing wrong with that’s what you do Absolutely nothing wrong. But definitely full-math rehab, one-to-one mentorship is essential and for some reason, people just aren’t doing it, and it always was something that interested me a lot. So for anybody out there who’s a budding full-math rehab dentist, or even somebody who’s really into it, 110% check that group out, because, to my knowledge, it is unique. Dev, you have been so generous with your time today, sharing your wisdom, knowledge and experience. Is there anything that you’d like to say in conclusion?

Devang: 

to wrap things up, no, just last word get investing.

Dr James: 

I love it. Nice and succinct, nailed it. Dev, it’s been a pleasure having you on the Dentistry University podcast today. I’m looking forward to catching up with you very soon, my friend, I’ll see you.

Devang: 

Thank you for inviting me.

Dr James: 

My pleasure. If you enjoyed this podcast, please hit, follow or subscribe so you can stay up to date with information on new podcasts which are released weekly. Please also feel free to leave a positive review so others can learn about this podcast and benefit from it. I would also encourage any fans of the podcast to sign up to the free Facebook community from which the podcast originated. Please search Dentistry Invest on Facebook and hit join to become part of a community of thousands of other dentists interested in improving their finances, well-being and investing knowledge. Looking forward to seeing you on there.